Today’s society is comprised of a generation obsessed with productivity. Taking one look at any given city street can quickly reveal to anyone that 21st century individuals are always “doing something.” For instance, an individual can walk from his or her favorite restaurant back to work while simultaneously sending emails right in the palm of his or her hand. This is a generation of multi-tasking and “getting things done,” so it is easy to understand why the emphasis in the work force is placed on effectiveness, productivity, and efficiency. One of the primary goals of any level headed employer can be summed up in a simple question: how can this work load be completed with greater efficiency and increased automation? As most people in the business world know, the answer is equally simple. Communication is the key to workplace productivity and efficiency - especially within industrial environments. Those who are interested in learning more about the importance of communication within the scope of industrial environments may benefit from reading the information below.

Read more

Employees who are systematically exposed to unhealthy noise levels are required by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration to participate in a hearing conservation program. Many people may not be aware of what a hearing conservation program is, why it is important, or how one is set up. Those who work in environments in which potentially loud noise levels may cause physical or mental harm should be seriously invested in learning more about the hearing conservation program. Even more so, managers and employers should be among the most concerned; since an employer’s highest priority ought to be keeping his or her employees safe, the importance of these programs to employers and managers of workplaces around the globe cannot be overly emphasized.

Read more

Those who are well informed about on the job noise exposure and the dangers therein are typically familiar with the term “hearing protection ratings.” However, there are still many employers and employees who have not been adequately informed about hearing protection ratings and Noise Reduction Ratings. Individuals who are not familiar with the aforementioned terms may benefit from reading the brief explanation below. By remaining informed about occupational noise exposure and related concepts such as hearing protection ratings and Noise Reduction Ratings, employers and employees alike can intentionally pursue safety without reducing work efficiency.

Read more

Many people are unaware of the importance of intrinsically safe headsets and equipment; in fact, many individuals do not even know what the term alludes to. A previous two-part series on this blog spent some time unpacking the technicalities behind intrinsically safe headsets. People who are completely new to the concept may have difficulty understanding some of the more complex aspects; therefore, we have written a short piece to familiarize “beginners” with intrinsic safety.

Read more

Those who are not often involved in the world of hearing protection may be unfamiliar with the term “Digital Signal Processing.” Also known as DSP, Digital Signal Processing is used by only elite headset companies to create a safe experience in unnaturally loud work environments. Those who are considering purchasing a headset may want to consider the importance of Digital Signal Processing and how it impacts the effectiveness of overall performance in headset equipment.

Read more

OSHA Noise Exposure Limit

According to OSHA, noise exposure over 85 decibels (dB) can cause hearing loss. Normal day-to-day living exposes us to all kinds of noise, much of which can impact our hearing at a later date.

Read more

Acoustics and why do they matterIn today’s fast-paced society, the average worker’s everyday environment is becoming louder and louder. As more advanced forms of technology are incorporated into the tools used by employees on the job, noise has become a serious concern to health officials. Hand sorting a conveyor belt of food products is a thing of the past; in the present day, loud machinery creates quite a racket in plants around the world as tasks are accomplished at a speed many times that of the human hand.

Read more

frack·ing  noun \ˈfra-kiŋ\: the injection of fluid into shale beds at high pressure in order to free up petroleum resources (such as oil or natural gas)

Improved technology has increased the practice of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, over the past decade. The American Petroleum Institute has called the extraction of natural gas from shale "the most important domestic energy development in the last fifty years,” and fracking is one of over 150 new words and definitions added to Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary in 2014.

Read more

Download 7 Degrees of Hearing Loss Infographic Hearing loss is a general term that encompasses a wide range of problems and various degrees of disability. Hearing is one tremendously complex process that can be affected by a wide range of medical conditions and injuries.

Read more

Analog systems became popular among the general public around the 1930s and were particularly utilized within two-way radio communication systems. The analog two-way radio quickly became the communication system of choice among those in the business arena. However, as seasoned veterans in the field of on-the-job communication technology know, the analog method has hit the proverbial ceiling, leaving no room for further innovation and advancement in communication technology.

Read more
  Download Sensear's 7 Degrees of Hearing Loss Infographic