For quite a year now, we have been living with the tension of this pandemic. It would be amazing if we knew when things would get back to normal, but no one has answer to that. Between COVID-19 business interruptions, financial downturn and rising prices, businesses are feeling the tension.

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Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) and noise-induced tinnitus are two of the most common disabilities among the manufacturing industry workers in the United States.

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A noisy environment is one of the main stress triggers for employees and leads to reduced productivity. Common practices like shouting at others, or asking them to talk loudly are barely effective.

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Many of the world’s leading manufacturing companies contacted Sensear to reevaluate their communication solutions in the light of today’s new normal: Social Distancing. The companies want to invest in the best communication solution available to help protect their employees’ hearing as well as enable clear communication, all while maintaining six feet social distance.

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Even though most of the retail industry is facing uncertainty with the current COVID 19 situation, several direct to consumer brands selling non-essential items online have somewhat remarkably seen an increase in their online sales in the recent few weeks.

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COVID-19 has produced a prolonged attack on public life, especially indoor life. Many of the largest super-spreader events took place inside: at a church, in an auditorium, at a conference. The risk of infection in indoors is almost 19 times higher than in open-air environments, according to study from researchers in Japan.

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Rebecca Bernhard, a partner at international law firm Dorsey & Whitney LLP, in an April 1 webinar said, “The food industry is almost always put as a critical or essential industry, and usually exempt from even the most restrictive stay-at-home orders”.

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According to the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) an average of 22 million workers in the United States are exposed to dangerous levels of noise in the workplace. Considering that approximately $242 million is spent each year on workers’ compensation for disability due to hearing loss, it is imperative that companies take a proactive approach to preventing hearing problems. Ongoing exposure to noise levels that exceed 85 dB is able to cause substantial hearing damage. OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) recommends that workers are not exposed to noise levels that exceed 85 dB for extended periods of time.

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Every year, people around the world invest time in creating a list of New Year’s resolutions they hope to keep. In fact, about half of adults in the United States make them, according to IFLScience.com. The troubling thing is that only about 10% end up keeping them longer than a few months.

By this time, you’ve probably read quite a few of these lists stating the top resolutions to reach goals in your personal life, but what about at the workplace?  In our line of work, it’s critical that we’re constantly vigilant for new opportunities to protect employees’ hearing safety, and the New Year is a great time to look at common resolutions and use those for inspiration when developing our plans for the coming year.

 

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According to OSHA (Occupational Safety & Health Administration) about 30 million people are exposed to noise a year on the job, and it’s been one of the biggest concerns in the US for nearly 3 decades. In fact, there are quite a few high-noise environments where workers are exposed to harmful levels of noise.

While we’re typically used to thinking of mining, power plants and heavy vehicles as key environments, there are other jobs that can damage hearing as well. For example, if you operate a lawn mower, work at a night club, work at an airport on the ground or even as a shooting range marshal, you’re exposing your ears to 107dB of noise—to as high as 140dB.

Since hearing loss occurs at around 85dB, occupational hearing loss is proven to be the responsibility of the employer, it’s important to understand how it happens, the impact it has on workers—and your bottom line, and what you can do about it.

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  Download Sensear's 7 Degrees of Hearing Loss Infographic