POV: You're scrolling through your favorite social media platform and suddenly, the app crashes. Or you're at the airport trying to catch a flight home, and unexpectedly, every flight is canceled. Most people probably aren't thinking about data centers when they experience these inconveniences. Data centers have a significant impact on many different facets of the economy, and when they go down, the world comes to a halt. Not only does data center downtime cost a lot (about $9,000/minute on average), but data center downtime can be quite damaging, sometimes even endangering lives. 

Read more

According to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the annual financial impact to employers due to worker's compensation cases for employee hearing loss on the job is estimated to be $242 million. In fact, hearing loss is the most common work-related injury in the United States. Approximately 22 million workers are exposed to harmful noises daily on the job. Data centers are particularly noisy places, with the average noise level reaching up to 92 dB(A) around server areas, and within the server racks, noise levels can reach up to 96 dB(A). In all cases where noise levels exceed 85 dB(A) for more than 8 hours, it is well documented the impact that insufficient hearing protection can have on employees’ long-term hearing quality.

Read more

Wrong. Based on research found by us at Sensear, the average noise level around the server areas of a data center can be up to 92dB(A), and within the server racks, noise levels can reach up to 96dB(A). To put this into perspective, this is equivalent to listening to a motorcycle up close all day, for 48-52 hours a week (or more if there aren’t enough workers). How long and how loud can someone listen to sound without risking hearing damage? OSHA and NIOSH break this down in Figure 1 below.

Read more
  Download Sensear's 7 Degrees of Hearing Loss Infographic